Class Act II: Course Recommendations for Spring 2015

Spring semester is coming. What does your schedule look like?

Preliminary program filing has returned once again. Are you frantically trying to find one last class to fill out your course schedule for next semester? Or are you looking to try something new and exciting? The Nine Ways staff has you covered! Here are some of our writers’ course recommendations for next spring! And if they’re already full now, bookmark this page for the spring when program filing re-opens.

Course: Gender and Power in Transnational Perspective (Barnard) 
Professor: Lila Abu-Lughod 
Time: M 2:10-4:00PM 
Credit: 4 
Prerequisites: Critical Approaches or permission of the instructor.
Although I was skeptical of this class at first, I have really grown to love it because it brings in the intersectionality that is lacking in many classes on gender. The course is different each semester, with this semester focusing on the Middle East and the role that gender plays in the so-called “Muslim question”. Yet, the professor who is teaching it next semester (Lila Abu-Lughod) has written many books on the topic of women and gender in cultures outside of the United States so it is sure to be an interesting class and one that will make you re-think many of your previously held assumptions about women, especially those living in third-world countries.

Course: Abnormal Psychology (Barnard) 
Professor: Sumati Gupta 
Time: MW 10:10-11:25AM 
Credit: 3 
Prerequisites: BC1001 or permission of the instructor.
The psychology buff in me may be biased but this class was my favorite this semester. It offers a great introduction to various psychological disorders such as schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and others. This is a great course to take if you’re interested in pursuing clinical psychology, and is a prerequisite for Professor Gupta’s course on Intro to Clinical Psychology. Professor Gupta also runs a private practice in the city when she’s not teaching, which is very, very cool.

Course: Supervised Projects in Photography (Barnard) 
Professor: John Miller 
Time: M 11:00AM-12:50PM 
Credit: 3 
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 15 students. Must attend first day of class. Instructor permission required.
If you love photography, seriously consider taking this course. This class was really enjoyable – class meetings essentially consisted of students presenting their work and our homework was simply to go out and take photos of whatever interested us, building a project portfolio throughout the semester. You are required to take a course at the International Center of Photography – but that’s amazing when Barnard covers the cost and the course prices at the ICP normally run into the hundreds. Any level of expertise is welcomed in this class, and you can shoot in film or digital with any camera of your choice.

Course: Introduction to American Government and Politics (Columbia) 
Professor: Judith Russell 
Time: MW 11:40AM-12:55PM 
Credit: 3 
Prerequisites: L-course sign up (spaces still free at time of writing!).
Whether you intend to be a Political Science major or are just interested in gaining a better understanding of American politics, it’s much better to take this class in the spring when Professor Russell is teaching it. She has worked for candidates such as Hillary Clinton and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and is unabashedly liberal during lectures. She’ll offer to help you find an internship on the first day of class, and she manages to fit in a tremendous amount of information and humor into an hour and fifteen minutes. Work load is very manageable (midterm/final paper/final exam) with weekly discussion groups mandatory.

Course: Contemporary Issues in Education (Barnard) 
Professor: Linda Cole-Taylor 
Time: M 2:10-4:00PM or Tu 11:00AM-12:50PM 
Credit: 4 
Prerequisites: Open to all students however instructor permission required.
People who know me might be wondering why I recommended a class that has caused me the most pain this semester but the initial confusion and (ongoing) frustration over this class, to me, are worth it. I came in to this class with practically a blank slate, and when I was looking at the syllabus I was worried, since I couldn’t connect most of the topics to what I already know. As the course progressed, however, the reading and the weekly discussions illuminated a lot of perspectives I would never have even considered. Work load consists of weekly long readings, several 2-5 page response papers, one group project, and a final individual project. As it is a seminar, the professor expects you to talk.

Course: The American Congress (Columbia) 
Professor: Irwin Gertzog 
Time: MW 1:10-2:25PM 
Credit: 3 
Prerequisites: POLS W1201 or the equivalent, or instructor’s permission.
Congress is an interesting (and often frustrating) branch of the federal government, and the results of the 2014 midterms prove that it will continue to be the focus of politics for the next two years. Professor Gertzog is a total teddy bear who’s incredibly knowledgeable and invested in his students. He also includes a discussion of current events to keep his lectures timely, and I imagine it will be an interesting semester when the 114th Congress convenes next year. Work load is very manageable (take-home midterm and final, research paper) with no weekly discussion groups.

Course: International Law and the United Nations in Practice (Barnard) 
Professor: Shelley C. Inglis 
Time: W 6:10-8:00PM 
Credit: 4 
Prerequisites: Enrollment in the course is open to 18 undergraduates who have completed at least one core course in human rights and /or international law. Admission by permission from Dr. J.Paul Martin, Director, Human Rights Studies, e-mail: jmartin@barnard.edu.
Anyone with an interest in human rights should try this out. This class is taught by Shelley Inglis, who currently works at the United Nations Development Program and has worked in various UN and international organizations, and she means business. She expects you to understand the readings and has an irreverent, condescending way of talking. However, she gives good advice, and the content you learn is really interesting- though, like a lot of international law relating to human rights, it can get pretty depressing. Political Science majors, this does NOT fulfill your colloquium requirement! Workload consists of heavy reading, one midterm paper (6-8 pages), one final research paper (around 25 pages) – in short, a colloquium under a different name.

Course: Introduction to Art History II (Barnard) 
Professor: Anne Higonnet 
Time: MW 2:40-3:55PM 
Credit: 4 
Prerequisites: N/A
This course is fantastic. Anne Higonnet is charming, passionate and unbelievably knowledgeable. You don’t need any background in Art History to take this course – just an interest in learning about various styles and forms of art, from impressionist paintings to photography or African masks to the NYC High Line. You will learn about art that spans centuries and continents, as well as take two class visits, most probably to the Met and to the High Line. You are required to partake in a weekly discussion section which was painless in my experience. If you’re still not convinced, consider this – this class will fulfill any of three (!) BC requirements: Cultures in Comparison (CUL), Historical Studies (HIS) or Visual and Performing Arts (ART).

The Art Of The Essay (Barnard)
Professor:Aaron C. Schneider/Shelly Fredman/Wendy C. Schor-Haim
Time:T 10:10AM-12:00PM/W 2:10-4:00PM/R 2:10-4:00PM
Credit: 3
Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 12 students.
Looking for a class that’ll kick your writing skills into shape? This is the one to take. The essays you’ll read and explore in this class aren’t dry, monotonous academic theses, but rather personal, emotional pieces of writing that utilize techniques and methods you’ll learn to integrate into your own writing. Classes are small, and you’re expected to distribute copies of your writing to the ten or so other students in the class. Although daunting at first, the class pushes budding writers to grow in both skills and in confidence.

Have course recommendations for the spring? Leave a comment below!

Image courtesy of Pinterest.

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Class Act: Course Recommendations for Spring 2014

Are memes even still a thing anymore?

Whether you’re dealing with last minute changes or never really had a plan in the first place, program-filing is one of the most stressful parts of a new semester. To help out, the staff of the Nine Ways of Knowing has composed a list of our favorite classes being offered this spring. If you need an enjoyable class to round out your schedule or are looking to fulfill a Nine Ways of Knowing requirement, we got your back!

Course: Reacting to the Past II
Professor: Mark Carnes
Time: M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Credit: 4 points
Fulfills: Ethics and Values (EAV), Historical Studies (HIS)
“But I haven’t taken Reacting to the Past I yet!” you say. Not to worry! Reacting to the Past II is not built on information you learn in the Reacting to the Past first-year seminar. Rather, it is a history seminar open to students from both Barnard and Columbia, where students take on historical roles and try to change the course of history. For example, last year we reenacted the French Revolution and the Indian Revolution. But the most fun thing about the class is that the events do not always play out as they did in history. For example, I was killed in the French Revolution game, even though, as a Jacobin, I should have stayed alive for many more years. The class inspires you to put extra time and effort in because not only is the winner of each “game” promised honor and glory, you get a boost in your grade. Professor Carnes never breaks character, and you get to know people on a much deeper level when you are scheming with them, or working out compromises, or even “murdering” them. The class not only allows you to engage with your peers on a deeper level than your average seminar, but I learned more about history by acting it out than I ever would have listening to a professor!
*Warning: If you don’t like public speaking, this isn’t the class for you. Students are expected to make at least six speeches during the semester, and many students speak far more than that.*

Course: Worldmuse Ensemble
Professor: Jane McMahan
Time: W 8:00pm-9:45pm, F 2:15pm-4:00pm
Credit: 3 points
Fulfills: Visual and Performing Arts (ART) 
If you’re interested in learning about music from other cultures, as well performing and creating music in an open and creative environment, this class is for you. Guest musicians living in NYC come to this class representing all parts of the world, and this class gives you the opportunity to appreciate the diversity of music in the city. Very little work besides rehearsal time, and a very loosely graded concert report. Different every year, and for complete beginners as well as experienced musicians, this class is a great time and you will meet some unforgettable people.

Course: Fundamentals of Western Music
Professor: Matthew Hough, Richard Miller
Time: MW 4:10pm-5:25pm, TR 4:10pm-5:25pm
Credit: 3 points
Fulfills: Visual and Performing Arts (ART)
If you have ever been interested in music theory, consider taking this class. Not a terrible workload, but significantly easier for performers that already have experience reading music. However, if you want to learn how to read music, this class is a good introduction that will definitely cater to your needs.

Course: Twentieth Century Art
Professor: Rosalind Krauss
Time: TR 2:40pm-3:55pm
Credit: 3 points
Fulfills: Visual and Performing Arts (ART)
Even if you have no experience with art history, you can definitely make your way through this class. Grading of bi-weekly responses to the reading depends on your TA in your discussion sections. But it’s definitely possible to stumble through pretty easily with a grade you’ll be happy with.

Course name: Introduction to Art History II 
Professor: Anne Higonnet
Time: MW 2:40-3:55pm
Credit: 4 points
Fulfills: Cultures in Comparison (CUL), Historical Studies (HIS), Visual and Performing Arts (ART)
I absolutely loved this course – Professor Higonnet was a delightful and passionate lecturer and we covered artwork that spanned continents and centuries. The artwork included paintings, sculptures, masks, architecture, photography and even the High Line which we visited, as well as the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Take this course if you are interested in art from the Renaissance to the modern era and if you have always wanted to learn more about both famous and lesser known works of art.

Course: The Worlds of Ntozake Shange
Professor: Kim Hall
Time: W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Credit: 4 points
Fulfills: NA
I’m super stoked for this class that focuses on the works of playwright, poet, feminist, and all around boss Ntozake Shange, who’s also a Barnard grad. Most commonly known for her play, (and the eventual Tyler Perry movie), for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, Ntozake Shange will also be present at at least one of the class periods. Excuse me while I fangirl in a corner.

Course: Modern American TV Drama
Professor: Christina Kalogeropoulou
Time: R 2:10pm-6:00pm
Credit: 3 points
Fulfills: Visual and Performing Arts (ART)
So I’m not actually taking this class due to a scheduling conflict with some major requirements, (damn you Genealogies of Feminism!), but this class essentially sounds like the best thing of all time. If the title of the class sounds like you’ll be essentially watching Mad Men, Breaking Bad, and Star Trek, you’re correct! It’s like the goddesses of Barnard actually read my mind and gave everyone the second semester senior class that they deserve!

Course: Feminist Theory
Professor: Tina Campt
Time: T 4:10pm-6:00pm
Credit: 4 points
Fulfills: NA
Yes, okay, this might not sound like the most interesting class if you’re not super into Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, but in addition to the fabulous Tina Campt, this class is being co-taught by none other than Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Leymah Gbowee. Yep, you read that correctly.

Course: Introduction to American Politics
Professor: Judith Russell
Time: MW 11:40am-12:55pm
Credit: 3 points
Fulfills:  Social Analysis (SOC)
I’ve heard that it’s better to take this course in the spring than the fall, and it’s easy to understand why. Professor Russell is perhaps one of the most memorable professors I’ve ever had. She’s funny, passionate, and gets the point across. She’s an unabashed liberal with connections to Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and Hillary Clinton, and she encourages her students on the first day to ask her about pursuing internships with various campaigns during office hours. When meeting with her one on one, she’s supportive and caring. The workload is fine: weekly discussions sections, midterm, final, and final paper, the topic of which you choose yourself. All in all, a great way to become familiar with the American political system during a contentious political time.

Course: Introduction to the Study and Theory of Film
Professor: Robert King
Time: T 9:30am-1:30pm
Credit: 3 credits
Fulfills: Visual and Performing Arts (ART)
While I had a different professor last semester, the subject matter remains largely the same. This is an easy and fun way to fulfill your art requirement if you don’t mind being in class for four hours. Class meets once a week, and more than half the time is spent watching films and clips for discussion. Grading tends to be very easy for a light workload: two five-page papers and a final (though there may also be a midterm this semester). I’m certainly not a student of film, and I came away looking at movies in a completely different way. This is also a great opportunity to see the classics that you might not otherwise watch on your own, i.e. Citizen Kane.

What courses would you recommend?

Image courtesy of Meme Generator.

TONIGHT: The Nine Ways of Knowing General Interest Meeting

Interested in writing, blogging, photography, and social media? Spend way too much time on websites like Tumblr and Buzzfeed? Want to have your opinions heard in the Barnard community? Then come to The Nine Ways of Knowing Fall 2013 General Interest Meeting, tonight at 9pm in room 302 of the Diana Center! As an added bonus, there will be pizza!

The Nine Ways of Knowing is the only publication dedicated to the issues, events, and opinions of the Barnard campus published on a daily basis. Every week, our staff meets to discuss what’s been happening on campus, in New York, and around the world. While we are happy to pitch ideas for the staff, we encourage our writers to pursue their own interests when writing. Many of our staff members cover subjects that are important to them, including food, music, politics, health and wellness, and popular culture. We aim to represent the diversity of opinion on Barnard’s campus and no experience is necessary.

This will be us at the General Interest Meeting.

If you can’t make the General Interest Meeting tonight, we will be meeting in room 302 of the Diana every Sunday at 9pm throughout the semester. Feel free to shoot us an email at ninewaysofknowing@gmail.com to demonstrate your interest.

We hope to see you tonight with an open mind and an empty stomach. And if you haven’t already, be sure to follow us on our many social media platforms:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theninewaysofknowing
Twitter:
https://twitter.com/9waysofknowing
Tumblr:
http://theninewaysofknowing.tumblr.com
Instagram:
http://instagram.com/9waysofknowing

Blogluv,
Laura K. Garrison
Editor-in-Chief
The Nine Ways of Knowing

GIF courtesy of Tumblr.

TONIGHT: The Nine Ways of Knowing General Interest Meeting

Study snacks! Omnomnomnom.
The Nine Ways of Knowing is having our General Interest meeting tonight at 9pm, in the Anna Quindlen Room of the Diana Center (when you walk into Liz’s place, it’s the first door on your right).
Check after the page break for more information about the blog and being a staff-member.

And yes, there will be an air swimmer!!!! (see YouTube video above)


———-
The blog is currently looking for writers, photographers, web-designers, social media gurus, and any willing to contribute to our goal of broadcasting the voice of Barnard students!

In case you don’t know, the blog is Barnard’s only student-run daily publication. We cover interests and opinions of very diverse body of Barnard students, which gives our staff a lot of freedom to write about whatever it is that they’re interested in. We’re a very new organization, which really means that our writers and new staff members have a chance to leave their mark on the blog and a SGA-recognized organization.

We’ve had a lot of people start their own columns about particular topics that interested them (for example, food, local music scenes around Columbia, popular music, wellness, politics, etc.), or create their own positions of benefit to the blog. From a journalistic perspective, we are often challenged with covering sensitive and current issues around Columbia’s campus and the city at large. Unlike other publications around campus, we are very open to covering events happening around the city in the right context. Also, if someone doesn’t know what they’d like to write about, we’re usually able to help our writers find a topic that they’d be interested in covering.

If you’re unable to make it, but would still like to get involved, please don’t hesitate to email us at ninewaysofknowing@gmail.com! And if you are ever moved to write about an issue that you are passionate about, feel free to email us about it. We often accept guest contributions to platform other people’s thoughts and opinions!

Thanks for your interest!
Olivia Goldman
Editor-in-Chief of The Nine Ways of Knowing

Thanksgiving Family Drama

What is it about Thanksgiving and other large family gatherings that bring out the drama in even the calmest of families? If this year’s Thanksgiving was particularly dramatic, take solace in the fact that you are not alone. Below are some of the best tales of family drama from The Nine Ways of Knowing staff.

“When I told my mother that I had been invited to my boyfriend’s for Thanksgiving and wanted to go she accused me of ‘forgetting I had a family.'”

Once, my sister had a friend over while my grandparents were visiting. When she attempted to introduce her friend to our grandpa he looked right at her said ‘I have enough friends’ and walked away.

“My father’s ex-girlfriend, who he dumped for my mother, tried to make friends with my sister at our grandmother’s funeral. It was really awkward.”


“My aunt trapped me in a chair for two hours to talk about my life when I was a college sophomore. She decided that I was going to get a Masters in Library Science (nope) and go into market research (so wrong). So many family members walked by and didn’t try and save me, and my father never even noticed it was happening.”

“One summer, my extended family got together for a family reunion. I was catching up with a couple of my cousins who I hadn’t seen in a while. We were having a pleasant chat, when all the sudden one of my cousins dropped a bombshell on us: her father had been cheating on her mother. He had been working in New York, and started to keep an apartment for this second woman, even though they struggled financially. The second woman got pregnant, so my uncle moved her to Boston, the same city as his family. My uncle’s mother owns a private clinic, and was expected to deliver the baby. Eventually my aunt found out, but when she did, my uncle stopped being interested in the second woman, and wanted my aunt back. My cousin (who’s slightly younger) witnessed the scene unfold, and had a mental breakdown afterwards, and had to drop out of school and spend time in a psychiatric clinic. Regardless, my aunt left him, and then met another woman at her high school reunion whom she started seeing. My aunt’s new girlfriend, however, had just gotten out of a relationship with an overly-dependent blind woman, who would harass my aunt and her new girlfriend. Somewhat customary for my family, my aunt and uncle showed up at the reunion as a perfectly happy couple. If asked, my uncle’s mother would deny the entire situation. At first I questioned whether my cousin was telling the truth, until the story was later confirmed. My aunt and uncle were separated for a while, but now they’re getting along fine. My cousin is still in and out of psychiatric wards.”

Image courtesy of Some Ecards.

Coming Soon To A Student Theater Near You

This upcoming weekend is a surprisingly rich one in terms of Columbia University student theatre, but with so many choices, it can be tough to figure out which show you would like to see! If you’re a theatre aficiando, here’s a guide to help you decide:

If you’re into politics, rock and roll, and history (not to mention pot)…

Columbia Musical Theatre Society presents Hair, the classic musical about love, drugs, and rock and roll during the Vietnam War. A group of hippies living in bohemian New York react to the changing world around them while trying to live free and happy lives, which becomes difficult when their group leader Claude is drafted. This musical includes timeless songs like “Let the Sun Shine In,” “The Age of Aquarius,” and “Good Morning Starshine.”

Directed by Katie Cacouris CC’15
Thursday at 8pm, Friday at 8pm, Sunday at 2pm
Tickets are $5 for CUID holders, $10 for non-CUID holders

If you’re looking for something free, short, and funny (not to mention making fun of everything you ever thought was pretentious about theatre)…

Columbia University Players presents a night of three one-act plays spoofing theatrical practices. One parodies Medea by Euripides, another makes fun of what actors do and think throughout a performance, and another shows two people in a marriage reading out the Post-it notes they leave for each other.

Directed by Lizzy Markman BC ‘16, Margot Sturc BC ’13, and Eric Wimer CC’16.
Friday at 10pm, Saturday at 7pm and 10pm
Tickets are FREE for CUID holders and $5 for non-CUID holders

If you enjoy love stories, classical theatre, and free tickets (not to mention Shakespeare in Love)…

King’s Crown Shakespeare Troupe presents Shakespeare’s classic tragedy Romeo and Juliet about two lovers in Verona whose family do not want them to love each other because of an old family rivalry. Juliet is expected to marry Paris and Romeo is banished for killing Juliet’s cousin Tybalt, so with the help of Juliet’s nurse and Friar Laurence, they devise a plan to elope and run away.

Directed by Elizabeth Powers CC ’13.
Thursday at 8pm, Friday at 8pm, Saturday at 8pm
Admission is FREE
NOTE: All the performances of Romeo and Juliet are currently sold out, but if you arrive at the door early, there will be a waitlist.

Go see one or go see them all!

Images courtesy of each troupe, respectively.

TONIGHT: The Nine Ways of Knowing General Interest Meeting

The Nine Ways of Knowing is having our General Interest meeting tonight at 9pm, in the Anna Quindlen Room of the Diana Center (when you walk into Liz’s place, it’s the first door on your right).
Check after the page break for more information about the blog and being a staff-member.


———-
The blog is currently looking for writers, photographers, web-designers, social media gurus, and any willing to contribute to our goal of broadcasting the voice of Barnard students!

In case you don’t know, the blog is Barnard’s only student-run daily publication. We cover interests and opinions of very diverse body of Barnard students, which gives our staff a lot of freedom to write about whatever it is that they’re interested in. We’re a very new organization (started only a little over a year ago and fully recognized by SGA only this semester), which really means that our writers and new staff members have a chance to leave their mark on the blog and a SGA-recognized organization.

We’ve had a lot of people start their own columns about particular topics that interested them (for example, food, local music scenes around Columbia, popular music, wellness, politics, etc.), or create their own positions of benefit to the blog. From a journalistic perspective, we are often challenged with covering sensitive and current issues around Columbia’s campus and the city at large. Unlike other publications around campus, we are very open to covering events happening around the city in the right context. Also, if someone doesn’t know what they’d like to write about, we’re usually able to help our writers find a topic that they’d be interested in covering.

If you’re unable to make it, but would still like to get involved, please don’t hesitate to email us at ninewaysofknowing@gmail.com! And if you are ever moved to write about an issue that you are passionate about, feel free to email us about it. We often accept guest contributions to platform other people’s thoughts and opinions!

Thanks for your interest!
Olivia Goldman
Editor-in-Chief of The Nine Ways of Knowing